• 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1995
  • 1993
  • 1992
  • 1991
  • 1990
  • 1989
  • 1988
  • 1987
  • 1986
  • 1985
  • 1984
  • 1982
  • 1979
  • 1977
  • 1972
  • 1971
  • 1969
  • 1968
  • 1966
  • 1965
  • 1960
  • 1956
  • Institute of Transformational Technologies
  • National Automotive Innovation Centre
  • Push-Pull House
  • Alder Hey Community Cluster
  • RHS Garden Hyde Hall Hilltop Complex
  • Blows Yard
  • Global Witness Workplace
  • 16 Winchester Walk
  • BFI Mediatheque
  • Central Building Refurbishment
  • Jerram Falkus Office Fit-out
  • Conkers Aerial Walkway
  • Eastfields Estate Regeneration
  • Spring at Stonebridge Park
  • Project Genesis Research HQ
  • Maitland Park
  • The Hyde, Hendon
  • RHS Garden Bridgewater
  • Artist's House, Brixton
  • Bristol Harbourside Building 3a
  • IVIC: BIMSpace
  • Queen Mary University of London
  • Holy Cross Primary School
  • Cherry Tree Children's Centre
  • Bristol Harbourside Building 4
  • VLRNIC
  • Emerald Circus
  • Bunhill 2 Energy Centre
  • Pontifex Wharf
  • Hide House
  • House in Hampstead
  • Baldwin Terrace Residential Development
  • Rosendale Primary School
  • Cryfield Energy Centre
  • IINM
  • Maggie's Newcastle
  • RE-Fab House
  • Guardbridge Energy Centre
  • City University London
  • IIPSI
  • Foundry
  • Shenley Academy
  • BFI Master Film Store
  • Palestinian Museum
  • Forest Gate Community School
  • Shahat Garden City
  • Kew Herbarium, Library, Art & Archives Wing
  • Brampton Manor Academy
  • Torriano Junior School Gatehouse
  • Institute for Sustainability
  • Evans Granary
  • Olisa Library
  • The Green Mountain Project
  • John Hope Gateway
  • Letchworth Transition Town
  • Stonebridge Hillside Hub
  • Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Richmond Park Golf Clubhouse
  • International Digital Laboratory
  • Cambridge Conservation Campus
  • Bristol Harbourside Building 9
  • Bristol Harbourside Building 3b
  • Masshouse Block D
  • Gateway to Petra
  • Singapore Management University
  • Purcell School Music Centre
  • Barge Arm Development
  • Heart of the Forest Masterplan
  • Bristol Harbourside Building 10
  • Penarth Heights Regeneration
  • Li Ka Shing Library
  • Lewisham Young People's Centre
  • Centre for Mathematical Sciences
  • Education and Interpretation Centre
  • Downland Gridshell
  • International Manufacturing Centre
  • Millennium Primary School & Health Centre
  • Bristol Harbourside Masterplan
  • Faculty of Divinity
  • Private House
  • UEL Docklands Campus
  • Ludgate Hill
  • Chester Amphitheatre Hotel
  • Hooke Park
  • Pittville Art College Campus Masterplan
  • Archaeolink Visitor Centre
  • University of North Carolina Masterplan
  • Clach Mhor
  • St John's College Library
  • Goldney Hall Student Residences
  • Petershill House
  • Fountains Abbey Visitor Centre
  • BP International Group Learning Centre
  • Bedfont Lakes Offices
  • Charles Cryer Theatre
  • RMC International HQ
  • Farnborough Grange Junior School
  • Chilworth Park Research Centre
  • Morrison Street
  • MacIntyre Milton Keynes
  • Crookham Junior School
  • Beechwood Lodge Hostel
  • Copped Hall Offices
  • Lambeth Community Care Centre
  • Whittington Centre
  • Uplands Conference Centre
  • Westoning Manor
  • Winchester College Arts Centre
  • St Mary's Church
  • Royal Opera House
  • Calthorpe Park School
  • Charlie Chaplin Adventure Playground
  • Bradwell Common 2
  • Westmoreland Road
  • Leighton Crescent
  • Highgrove Housing
  • Olivetti's New Branches
  • Branksome Hilders, Olivetti
  • Minster Lovell Conference Centre
  • House on the South Downs
  • Garrett House
  • Camden Mews
  • Bartholomew Villas
  • Marvin House
  • Horder House
  • Bell Tout Lighthouse
View: Grid List

Immersive Visualisation

is the future of design here?

The time saving and coordination benefits of BIM are well known in the UK, hence the government’s heavy promotion of its use. Over the last 18th months we have invested a lot of  effort along with our TSB research project (IVIC) partners Hyde Housing, WMG, and Holovis into optimising the outputs from our Building Information Models (BIM) and make it work harder as a design tool. 

We have investigated how the automotive industry has been using visualisation techniques at design stage, be that through the use of large format power walls or immersive CAVE environments. One of our early successes was the adoption of LumenRT. This piece of software allowed us to quickly export fully rendered walkthroughs direct from the BIM model. The output is freely navigable, akin to a video game, and allows us interrogate design options from various vantage points. We frequently use real time rendered walk throughs during design sessions with our consultants, our large format wrap around screens enable us to virtually markup the model and share the results.

Dialogue with our clients has greatly benefited from navigable models. Sharing the model allows them to explore our designs in their own time, hence they arrive at meetings better informed. To the uninitiated in construction traditional forms of communication such as 2D plans and sections are often illegible, a 3D tour in “first person” mode makes the building instantly understandable.

Clip of our navigable NAIC model

Our latest experiment is one step further going to the level of full immersion with the use of a virtual reality headset (Oculus Rift SDK2). This is still a development piece of hardware, and as such is not as user friendly in terms of content creation as retail products. Having said that the results far outstrip any of the other visualisation products we use. The sense of immersion is all encompassing and you feel you have left your desk once you don the headset. You can explore every corner of your building taking in the grand sense of space within a 4 story atrium to a moment later bending over to examine a handrail connection detail.

Testing the Oculus Rift

We still have a lot of work to do to limit the nausea some users can experience and to better integrate it into our workflow but the end goal makes the effort worth it. Facebook also agree after they forked out $2billion for Oculus Rift earlier this year despite the product not yet being on the market! VR is on its way, it’s up to us in the construction industry to be creative with the ways in which we use this new tool to both design and sell our ideas.